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Infuse Spring Celebrations with Grilled Lamb PDF Print E-mail
Written by San Fernando Valley Sun   
Wednesday, 12 March 2014 22:35

Roasted leg of lamb traditionally takes center stage for spring celebrations around the family dinner table. This flavorful recipe from Boston Chef Michael Scelfo for Grilled American Lamb Sirloin is a fresh spin on whole leg roasts, and simplifies spring entertaining. While sirloin chops are commonly found in grocery stores, consider ordering a whole sirloin roast - a portion of the leg - from your butcher for a larger gathering.

Though you may be most familiar with roasting or braising, American lamb can be deliciously prepared a variety of ways. For example, this grilled lamb recipe pairs a zesty marinade with a hint of cacao for a fresh and seasonal American lamb spread. Simple marinades and rubs will bring out the best in lamb, creating a fresh flavor that enhances and tenderizes the meat.

Invest in a quality meat thermometer to avoid overcooking lamb. The key to tender and flavorful meat is removing the lamb from the heat when it reaches 135 degrees. Then, let it rest before cutting, bringing the internal temperature to 145 degrees (medium rare).


Lamb and Your Health


Foods bringing both flavor and nutrition to the table are the perfect fit for today's lifestyles. As a delicious and nutrientrich food, lamb is a natural choice. Its convenience and versatility are perfect when quick-cooking is in order. Our white paper, Lamb: Its Place in the U.S. Diet, is an excellent resource.

Lean

On average, a 3-ounce serving of lamb is lean, has only 175 calories and meets the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) definition for lean. According to FDA guidelines, lean meat has less than 10 grams of fat, less than 4.5 grams of saturated fat, and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 100 grams or 3.5 ounces. The leanest cuts of lamb include those from the leg, loin and shank.

Nutrient Rich

Lamb is also nutrient rich, making it a natural fit for healthy diets. On average, it's an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, niacin, zinc and selenium and a good source of iron and riboflavin. In addition, lamb is available to meet a range of preferences—from natural or organic lamb to lamb that has been exclusively grass-fed or grain finished. http://leanonlamb.com/nutrition/




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