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Savory Snacking with a Pantry Staple PDF Print E-mail
Written by NoAuthor   
Wednesday, 18 June 2014 23:08

From everyday snacking to entertaining at parties, Americans adore their snacks. So, it's no surprise that nearly 100 percent of Americans snack at least once every day, according to a recent survey conducted by the California Olive Committee.

Interestingly, the survey found that consumers, who snack most frequently at home on weekends, overwhelmingly prefer easy-to-prepare homemade snacks over prepared store-bought varieties.

One versatile and affordable ingredient that pumps up the flavor of a wide array of snack recipes is the ripe olive. Olives are a double-duty pantry staple - ideal for snacking right out of the can and perfect to have on hand for preparing simple, mouth-watering snack recipes at home.

From pickling with spices and vegetables, to adding a pop of color and texture to hummus or cream cheese-stuffed celery, California Ripe Olives are a flavorful addition to crowdpleasing snacks.

Here are some simple, scrumptious recipes that are sure to cure any snack attack.

For more tasty snacking recipes, visit www.CalOlive.org.


THE OLIVE IN CALIFORNIA

As the Franciscans marched north, establishing missions in California, they also planted olive groves. Southern California saw the first olive trees. According to an account in Judith Taylor's book, The Olive in California, a visitor to Mission San Fernando in 1842 saw the mission buildings in ruins but the orchard with a good crop of olives. The visitor remarked that the mission probably had the biggest olive trees in the state. Subsequently in the past 150 years, trees have been planted in several waves along with interest in olives and olive oil. Many of these older groves (80-150 years old) still exist in California. Most are in Northern California. In Southern California population and housing pressure have put the farmers out of business. There are many isolated trees or fragments of old groves but the land is too expensive for olive growing. Income per acre is 10 times lower than other crops like wine grapes and even those can't compete with development potential.

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Last Updated on Friday, 20 June 2014 19:23